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Karaoke session helped form Kings of Leon

Karaoke session helped form Kings of Leon

OPEN MIC NIGHT: Kings of Leon, from left, Jared Followill, Caleb Followill, Nathan Followill and Matthew Followill attend a listening party for their new album "Mechanical Bull" hosted by Klipsch at the Dream Hotel on Monday, Sept. 23, 2013 in New York. Photo: Associated Press/Photo by Evan Agostini/Invision/AP

Kings of Leon stars Nathan and Caleb Followill realized they were destined to become rock stars after sneaking into a karaoke bar as teenagers and performing Wild Cherry’s “Play That Funky Music.”

The siblings couldn’t believe their luck when their rendition of the song took the audience by storm – and won them a clutch of female fans.

Caleb tells Entertainment Weekly magazine, “It was my 18th birthday, on Bourbon Street (in New Orleans, Louisiana)… and that was actually the first time I ever got onstage and sang.

“A woman flashed us and we looked at each other and were like, ‘All right, I guess this is what we’re gonna do forever.'”

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