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Man gets draft notice, 102 years late

Man gets draft notice, 102 years late

A LITTLE PAST DUE:The Selective Service System notice arrived Saturday, about a century too late. Photo: clipart.com

KENNERDELL, Pa. (AP) — A western Pennsylvania woman says her late father has received notice to register for the nation’s military draft, some 102 years too late.

Martha Weaver, now in her 80s, tells The (Oil City) Derrick that the Selective Service System notice arrived Saturday in Rockland Township, Venango County. That’s about 60 miles north of Pittsburgh.

Her father’s name was Fred Minnick, though the notice misspelled the last name “Minick,” and warns that failure to register is “punishable by a fine and imprisonment.”

Trouble is, her father was born June 12, 1894, which means he would have been 18 and eligible for the draft in 1912.

Weaver suspects the confusion was spawned by the incorrect birth date on the form, which lists the birth year as 1994.

Minnick had died by then, on April 20, 1992.

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